MG-Rover.org Forums banner

2721 - 2740 of 2755 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,516 Posts
Puzzled why folks use the term "Fail" or "Failed" when a more accurate term surely should be ...

worn..or ... wear.

Nothing lasts forever and most things wear ...

Please take lots of images when you do the Belts and the Linkage Kit. I and no doubt many others will really appreciate seeing those. That way we all learn.
:nerd: The term fail is ok with me as a starter. From there you can go on, investigate, and decide whether its fair wear and tear, early life failure, or perhaps misuse.
 

·
Registered
mg_zs
Joined
·
12 Posts
Today, I put my MG up for sale. It's been tremendous fun, but it's time for a change. I daren't add up the parts cost, but we never went into car ownership to make money, right? It's floating around the Facebook groups and Gumtree as I'm not a fully paid up member here, but if you spot HV04TNN, that's me.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
650 Posts
Today, the ZS got a full service and a new exhaust.


  • Oil & oil filter change. Castrol semi-synth 10w40 this time, with an OEM filter.
  • Air filter. OEM.
  • Fuel filter. Bosche.
  • Sparkplugs. NGK PFR6N-11. Not as difficult to change the rear bank as I feared, but you need the right sized socket extension (I used a flexible extension). Also, use a magnetic spark plug socket - I consider this one of the best tools I've bought in years. Old plugs had ~76k on them and were visibly worn.
  • One new ignition coil (working, I think - but had a big crack down the side).
  • Cam position sensor from DMGRS - a Siemens VDO unit replacing the emergency unbranded one I got from ECP - because it was not working well, with random loss of power. If you have a choice, always go with decent branded sensors.
  • A Piper stainless steel back box, with the "A" tip. An absolute bugger to fit as it's so much bigger than the standard one - a perfect fit when in but I actually resorted to putting a jack under it to force it into place...! No more fitting rusty mild steel exhausts every 2 years.

On the test drive, it felt like there was more power. And the Piper exhaust makes a lovely noise - louder, but the closest I've had to OEM yet!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
650 Posts
Right then..

Start of November, found a pool of water in the drivers side footwell.

I took out out the seats and carpet so I could try it out properly. The leak was caused by a combination of blocked channels under the windscreen plus seam gaps behind the front wings - several threads on this in these forums. All sorted, tested under the hose and no new leaks. A nice opportunity to get the carpets really clean too!

But, given that 'it never rains but it pours'.. I found coolant on the carpet. The heater matrix was leaking.

So, by stealing an hour or two here and there over the next 5 weeks:
  • I stripped out the dash,
  • drained the coolant,
  • removed the heater unit,
  • changed the heater matrix with a second hand one (risky approach - maybe this one only has a month's life left in it?)
  • replaced the heater unit,
  • improved the seals around the air vents - the poor fit goes some way to explaining the poor performance,
  • refilled with coolant (no leaks!),
  • rebuilt the dash,
  • test fired the engine and very pleased to see no leaks as coolant pressure built up. Any leak at this point would have meant a lot of disassembling.
  • Added new soundproofing to the floor,
  • reinstalled the carpet,
  • reinstalled the seats,
  • took it for a drive.
Since I was doing a lot of interior work on the car, I replaced the original Kenwood head unit and 10 disc MP3 changer, including all my old custom Car PC bits and FM tuner. A good friend to me over my long commutes in past years.
Now I have a new JVCKenwood headunit with DAB and Bluetooth - all I need these days. As a bonus this has a reversing camera - chosen basically because I can run the cables nicely while the interior is out. It's nice to have proper phone integration too.

And finally, since it got cold while the car was parked up, I put the winter tyres on.

Lessons learned:
1. Removing the dash is not difficult.
2. But removing the heater matrix is a lot of extra work on top of removing the dash.
3. I have very little free time.
4. Having lost my comfortable garage, any rainy weather puts a stop to a lot of work. Cold weather makes work uncomfortable.

I still have the cam belts to do, but I think I'll wait for spring.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
650 Posts
And finally, since it got cold while the car was parked up, I put the winter tyres on.
Four months of good behaviour later, I swapped back to the summer tyres today.

The new software and redesign of this forum seems to have been a disaster and finally killed off regular participation, but I'm still here and still telling the story of my ageing ZS 180.

As I write this, the COVID-19 pandemic is killing thousands across the world and we are on lockdown at home. I can work from home so I don't have any more free time than usual during the week, unfortunately. Or fortunately.

However the weekends are much freer for me to enjoy my sheds and garage!

While swapping the wheels today, I did my customary check of the brakes. This time, all the callipers, discs and pads were fine. Nothing seized. This shouldn't be a surprise for those following here as pretty much everything in the braking system is new.

For a little extra job, I had to re-seal a gap in the bodywork under the fuel filler, which I mentioned on here a number of years ago. A dribble of water was getting into the boot again as the old fix (bodge) was starting to fail.

The main work I did today was new front brake pads. Yes, the old ones were only two years and 6000 miles old - but I've had a niggling worry about poor performance. When hot, the brakes are good, but in normal driving noticeably worse than other cars. The only component left that it could be was the front pads - I'd gone with my usual OEM, MGR branded ones but I wonder if the compound on newer pads is different? I had bought some Mintex pads 8 months ago, at half the price of OEM, and finally fitted them today.
Well, I'm amazed. Obviously I can't run them in yet but incredibly they seem better than the old pads after going just 1 mile around the block!

Of course, it's never plain sailing these days - I did find a problem. A local garage fitted new CV gaiters last year and despite being not even 12 months old, both are perished. Both covered in cracks and one has split and spat grease out. So that'll be next weekend's work: both CV gaiters, and I've decided to do some of the more rotten ARB bushes while I'm in there. I'm going to do the work myself this time - I've never removed a hub so it's something new to try.

I've still not done the cam belts, but bracing myself for that job this summer.
 

·
Premium Member
mg_zt_t
Joined
·
21,905 Posts
Thanks for that. Good interesting read.

MINTEX/BREMBO Pads. Have driven/owned SIX MG ZTs and whilst their brakes were OK, pin down from speed, none had the "feel" I like as my Rover 620ti and my wife's MG ZS. The last ZT-T 1.8T I owned, sold a few years ago, DID have braking "feel" approaching those of the Ti and ZS. With every "new" used car I buy, one of those things I try to do ASAP is check all round the brakes. This latest ZT I could just see the remains of the make of pads through the dirt... MINTEX.

I fitted new MINTEX to my other ZT-Ts and soon after both those cars had the brake "feel", "bite" and progressive braking action I prefer. Sorted.

When I ordered MINTEX Pads for ZT190 Spec Calipers, the ebay seller sent Pads for the lower spec 75/ZTs which do not have the BMW Front Caliers. I pointed this out and they sent the correct ones and told me to keep and dispose of the wrong ones they sent as I see fit. Its an ill wind and all that.

Those wrong pads can be made to fit ... with a "Big 'ammer" Clarkson style, but obviously that is far from desirable. One ZT190 I worked on had those "lesser" spec cars' pads fitted ... no dount with some Big 'ammer appliaction as the image shows. Other images show the BIG difference between the two types of ZT Front Brake Pads.
134904
134905
.

These images show it is wise to check brakes on any used car you buy ..ASAP...
134906
. just in case. By the way, Both the MINTEX and BREMBO Brake Pads I bought for the ZT190 Calipers looked identical. Except for the branding. Even the boxes they came in and packing to stop the Pads rattling about in transit were identical excpet for branding. I'd bet a few quid both pads came off the same manufacturing production line. Fitted to both ZT190 Caliprs, their performance is also identical. Thumbs up from me. These are the BMW Spec. ZT190 Caipers.
134907
134908
134909


BREMBO and MINTEX... Suits me Sir!... :) Recommended.. for both ZS and ZT MGs.
 
  • Like
Reactions: nOw2

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
650 Posts
Of course, it's never plain sailing these days - I did find a problem. A local garage fitted new CV gaiters last year and despite being not even 12 months old, both are perished. Both covered in cracks and one has split and spat grease out. So that'll be next weekend's work: both CV gaiters, and I've decided to do some of the more rotten ARB bushes while I'm in there. I'm going to do the work myself this time - I've never removed a hub so it's something new to try.
And onwards. I delayed starting this by couple of days as Hermes managed to send my 32mm socket to the wrong side of the country - it got here eventually but took a week instead of 2 days.

I mostly followed comeinhandynow on YouTube:
Really good to have that video with direct first-hand information and tips for the ZS.

I used mostly OEM parts from Rimmers and so I did not use the stretchy type boots - I don't want any risks or workarounds so went with the standard type. The garage that fitted the replacements last year used the type that are split and then glued into place.

Process:
  • With the car on the ground, loosened the hub nut.
    • Unstake (I used several, gradually larger, flat head screwdrivers) then loosen normally with a 32mm socket (both sides are anti-clockwise).
    • Really good idea to invest in a breaker bar - I used a large torque wrench set to 182Nm and it took my full weight standing on it to break it free.
    • IMG_2364.jpeg
  • Loosen your wheel nuts at the same time, unlike me who had the car raised before realising I'd forgotten. Doh.
  • I'm doing both sides, so the whole front is up and on stands.
  • Remove the hub from the lower ball joint:
    • Pull out the pin on the castle nut. Make sure you have a replacement. The minimum is 2x12mm and I believe factory 2x20mm.
    • Remove the castle nut. 18mm socket, 43Nm force.
    • Remove the balljoint - now, I thought that I've finally have a use for the balljoint remover I bought years ago. No - it didn't fit. My method was the same as comeinhandynow - a crowbar...
  • Once the balljoint is released from the arm, you don't need to remove anything else.
    • But - I think moving the steering rack tie rod too far out of normal is not good. I had a small escape of what seemed to be power steering fluid. It may be sensible to unbolt the tie rod too.
  • Carefully pull the hub off the driveshaft. Don't pull the driveshaft out of the gearbox..!
  • I supported the assembly on a trolly jack:
  • Remove the old boot. I cut off the old clips (the garage had used just a cable tie for the small-end on both sides), then sliced the boot off using a Stanley knife. This is where it gets messy.
    • Use lots of brake cleaner and wipes. Make sure you've got a spray can and blue roll ready.
  • Danger time - you now need to remove the CV joint.
    • The method to do this is to hit it sharply with a rubber mallet, in a vice with the driveshaft removed.
    • This causes a spring circlip to release and the joint drops off.
    • Since the driveshaft is still attached, we want to do this in a way that doesn't pop it out of the gearbox!
    • comeinhandynow's method is to pin the shaft with molegrips - and this worked for me.
    • IMG_2372.jpeg
    • Hit the back of the CV hard but carefully. It'll break free
  • Clean the driveshaft.
    • Brake cleaner and blue paper.
    • Mine wasn't cleaned last year - there was dry, solid mud/dirt stuck to the driveshaft. Luckily that hadn't found its way into the CV itself.
  • Remove the circlip. You should replace it. I didn't, as I ordered the inner CV clips, which are bigger... Mine appear to have survived anyway.
  • Push the new CV gaiter onto the driveshaft. Secure with the small clip. Make sure you have the correct tool for installing these - the clips are special as they have a mostly even weight all around, to ensure the driveshaft remains balanced. Don't use normal hose clips.
  • Reinstall the circlip.
  • Check that the grease in the CV joint is clean.
  • Push the CV back onto the driveshaft.
  • Fill the gaiter with ALL the provided grease.
  • Pull the gaiter over the CV and secure with the 2nd large clip.
  • Clean up the mess using brake cleaner and blue paper :)
  • IMG_2383.jpeg
  • Clean all the mating surfaces - like for the balljoint.
  • Move the hub back into place and reinstall the driveshaft.
  • Drop the hub balljoint back into place.
  • Put a new hub nut on. Finger tight.
  • Put the castle nut back on. Tighten to 43Nm, then tighten more until the holes and 'crenelations' line up.
  • Install a new split pin.
  • At this point, I did some other work:
    • Replaced the top and bottom bushes of the ARB link.
      • I could NOT get the bar lifted enough to get access to the inner bushes, so they stay for now. They're solid but cracked.
    • Wire-brushed the suspension arms, sprayed with primer, then sprayed with black paint.
    • IMG_2389.jpeg
  • As I'll be doing the other side tomorrow, I haven't done this but the next steps are:
    • Put the wheel on.
    • Lower back onto the ground.
    • Tighten the hub nut to 180Nm. This is a lot..
    • Stake the hub nut with a chisel and hammer.
So, while I've spent about 4 hours on it total I'm very happy that I've managed to do this myself.

UPDATE 13th: completed the CV gaiter work on the driver's side. The second time, this was much quicker to do.
I have not done the roll bar drop link bushes on this side, as the outer bushes are fine and the inner ones are split - so this needs to wait until I can change the inner bushes. I still don't know how to access them easily. Hmm, I wonder - if I released both drop links at the the same time? Would the whole bar move up out of the way? I didn't think to try that!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
650 Posts
More lockdown activities:
  • Retrimmed the headlining.
    • Matched the original colour.
    • Really, really happy with it - it's like factory new now.
    • It wasn't too hard to do either.
    • I've got material for the door cards too, but that can wait for another weekend.
  • While the headlining was out, added a new LED light fitting to the rear of the headlining for the back seats.
  • Also while it was out, put sound deadening sheets on the inside of the roof.
    • What a difference! A really large reduction of noise from above when driving.
  • Fitted an MGTF rear view mirror - adds reading lights.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,516 Posts
n0w2 thanks for you CV gaiter how to. I noticed a split on my R25 n/s gaiter the other day and have parts on order. I’ll read you post again before tackling the job (y)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
650 Posts
Today I continued on day 2 of changing the cam belts on my ZS 180!

I'm documenting it and getting some photos, which I'll post later. But first, confirmation that you must not skip belt changes: as soon as the cover was off the front of the engine, right there on top was a crack on the main belt.

135285


This belt was fitted in 2009 at 90,000 miles, it's now 2020 and the car is on 168,000 miles. With an interval of 6 years, 90,000 miles, the belt is over-age by nearly 100% and closing in on the mileage lifetime too.
 

·
Premium Member
mg_zt_t
Joined
·
21,905 Posts
Keep up the good work. Take your time and double check. It aint Rocket Science. Look forward to the images.

Thirty years ago, I bought a new Timing Belt for my Montego and put it in the spare wheel well for safekeeping. 90,000 miles later I got a puncture and saw the still new in box Timing Belt I had somehow forgotten to fit!.. ... :doh: :oops:... Fitted it sharpish and after thirteen years of near 100% reliability, drove the car to my favourite scrap yard on the final day of it's MoT still pulling strong showing 133,000 miles like every Montego I've ever had does and did. Very bad wheel arch corrosion plus arrival of a brand new MG ZS 120+ sealed its fate of this faithful servant to the family.

When Rubber Timing Belts were first fitted to production cars, the recommended mileage intervals for Belt renewal was quite high. However, erring on the safety side and with Warrantees in mind, most manufacturers reduce those mileage renewal intervals. Most belts would last far longer than recommended but, some do not. Hence the change of mind by manufacturers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Owned my mk 2 zs 180 hatchback for 10 years now .PBT black and practicaly rebuilt the car.😉 i have been reading the posts on hear for a while now a and just thought id like to share with you all what i have done to mine starting with ....
Full engine rebuild heads skimmed valves re seated 190 cams. that was a while back now though forged pump water and all that ect..
Pektron ecu refurbished by teknozen
Dark ice design clutch hydraulics
Metal/alloy thermostat and housing (finally)😚 rubber manifold gaskets with sealant
Full (every pipe in engine bay is red ) Red ASH silicone hose replacement
Honda red topped the crankcase covers VHT RED WRINKLE with high temp lacquer. Removed mesh inside crankcase.
Red oil catch can with stainless steel breather pipes
Soldered and hot glued viz motor connections (dont get it near the motors .) Done mine 3 years ago still kicks good 😆
Replaced every single rusty nut in engine bay with stainless steel including clamps and clips
Full de cat with a modified saloon janspeed x power twin exhaust system poking out of a clio 197 rear diffuser
De baged
Anthracite metalic black alloys
Red calipers with eBay brembo stickers.
Auto art tail lights
Bonnet vents but not rs ones
Aero catch bonnet pins in carbon fibre . And im only half way through with the interior still got to do a couple of things yet . long term project that i am still absolutely loving . Ill never sell my zs . If you want any pics ill put a couple up regards paul
5d carbon fibre roof
Blue/ green plasma speedo dials with red led needles
matching red and black leather seats
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,516 Posts
Welly, I think pictures are required. Maybe best in the modifications and tuning area. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
No problem im slowly getting used to the site . It might look a bit dusty as its in the middle of a stage 3 paint correction and as i say im only half way through with what i want to do to it . By the way it was wreaked when i fist got it . Burst oil cooler .mayo everywere blocked radiator it was about to be scrapped at only 4 years old ( first registered in 2008 ) and 67 tho on clock . That was nearly 10 years ago now . Guy thought the head had gone 😎
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Camera has decided it doesn't want to take clear picks any more . Wont focus sorry . Ill take some better in sunlight later
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Do the mg zs 180 need a remap after all the mods or can ecu "relearn the values " i have heard or is that a mith ? Its fast and powerful had 135 out of it on a race track 😉 with more to go, i bottled it . Its surprising how much power there is in 5th gear 90 to 125ish is nice and clean with way more to go , way more .
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
650 Posts
Today I continued on day 2 of changing the cam belts on my ZS 180!
Slow going, but I did a bit more yesterday. I keep getting stuck, then get rained off (I really need to clear the garage of junk so the car can go back in!)

Last weekend ended with needing access to get the air con pump loose. The guides state that just loosening the oil cooler mounting gives access, but not the case with my car. I had to drain the oil and coolant and remove the cooler completely (at least I was planning on draining fluids anyway).

Then, I found that the lower bolt on the air con pump was very tight - I snapped a 1/4"->3/8" socket adaptor on first go! Fortunately not snapping the bolt or rounding it off (absolutely must use well-fitting 6-point hex sockets and not 12-point for this sort of job). Fortunately, my electric impactor made very short work of it and cleanly removed it with no damage. Some copper grease will have to go onto those threads before reassembly!

I am now stuck on removing the oil dip stick tube. I couldn't get it out a couple of years ago when doing the oil cooler pipes, but there is absolutely no way I can see to work around it this time - the huge alloy plate on the front of the KV6 isn't coming off with the dip stick in place. The red collar doesn't appear to depress at all.
A lot of online searching has found a few reports of similar issues - the tube becoming 'welded' into the holder. Plus plenty of horror reports of damaging the tube or the holder. I'm hoping not to have to remove the sump because of all the extra work it will entail, though it's getting to the point where I'd prefer to get a new connector (LYC100510L, only £15) and do the work to install it.
 
2721 - 2740 of 2755 Posts
Top