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Discussion Starter #721
That wouldn't surprise me in the slightest. Mind you. I haven't found it yet. Here's one. Some time ago. I lost a spring that went in one of my Airsoft guns. I found it a year later. It was on the top of a cupboard! I've no idea of how it got there!
 

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Discussion Starter #722
Another potential problem is beginning to rear its ugly head. For the past day or so. I keep getting a message on the 'Information readout' on the instrument panel, to the effect of: Rear Passenger Door is Open. The door is actually closed, but the message is still there. I can't lock the car (The alarm 'beeps' at me).

Now. The Rovers I had, had switches on the door frames. Jags seem to have them built into the door latches. This is going t take some time to fix. Grrrrr!
 

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Discussion Starter #723
Well. I've got to the bottom of the 'open door' mystery. I was right in saying that the sensor for the door is built into the latch itself. It seems that this fault is a known problem. Although it comes and goes. I've bought a 2nd hand replacement.

I could just cut the wire to fix the problem (The switch is gounded to send the signal), but that's not really good enough.

Keeping an 18 year old Jag in top notch condition sure is interesting!
 

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Discussion Starter #724
I thought I'd mention this in passing. Although I've bought a replacement rear door lock as a 'Just in case' measure (£15 Posted, so why not?). These Jags do have a habit of doing strange things when the battery gets low. The car will always start and run, but other electrical services will 'play up'. The most common one I've had is the radio wouldn't come on. It was an easy fix. Just switch off the engine and then start the car again. Now. The rear door sensor is a known problem (That's why I've bought a replacement and it 'went off' twice yesterday). However. When I got home. I did stick the battery on charge. Yes. The battery did need charging (It sure sucked up the Amps). I won't know until later today, if it has made any difference. If I get a weekend of peace. Then I'll know the battery was the problem and not the sensor.

As with all modern cars. The battery is in a state of drain with the engine switched off. It seems that Jags are more prone to 'oddities' than others.
 

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When I got home. I did stick the battery on charge. Yes. The battery did need charging (It sure sucked up the Amps). I won't know until later today, if it has made any difference. If I get a weekend of peace. Then I'll know the battery was the problem and not the sensor.
As with all modern cars. The battery is in a state of drain with the engine switched off. It seems that Jags are more prone to 'oddities' than others.
Hello buddie! 🤗
Since long I'm used to have my 75 continuously on charge when parked in the garage.
But don't panic: with my good Noco Genius charger (paid around £45 several years ago) the battery is charged only when needed. It automatically stops charging every time the maximum is reached. So no harm.
And rather regularly (around once a month) I'm charging the 25 and the 214 cab alternatively but by a long chalk it's the 75 which drains the most, then the 25 very close-by (the difference is the 25 is the missus' daily). The 214 cab is very thrifty because she's less modern indeed!
 

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Discussion Starter #726
Hello there!

I've got one of those smart charger thingys. It tells you when the battery is fully charged and then it effectively switches itself off. Moving on....

The Jag doesn't get as much use during the warmer, dry months. I tend to use my motorbike. However. The Jag still gets used weekly though. I do get the feeling that the battery is getting close to the end of its life. At first. I used to give it a top up charged every few months. Now it seems to be monthly. I suspect that I'll need a new battery before the end of the year.
 

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Discussion Starter #727
Well. It's been over 24 hours since I've given the battery a charge and the 'open door' alarm hasn't sounded. It looks like the battery was at fault and not the sensor. Mind you. I won't really know until the Sun come out again.
 

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Discussion Starter #729
I have just spent a misrable hour or so, changing the faulty lock on the Jag.

Before I started. I did my homework. I made sure I had the correct tools to hand. I read through the Haynes manual. I also watched a couple of guides on You Tube. Everything looked so easy. This should only take 10 to 15 minutes, I thought. What complete and utter BULL!.

It's not what the guides tell you that's the problem. It's what they don't. Of course. Video guides are edited. Even I know that. But all of the guides work on the assumption of: Everything works first time, every time. Sorry folks. Real life isn't like that. So what's the problem?

No two locks are exactly the same. I put everything together and tested the door lock when the door was open. It worked perfect. When I closed the door. It wouldn't open from the outside. It worked fine from the inside, but not outside.

What none of the guides tell you is: You may have to screw in or screw out the adjuster that's on the rod that connects the door handle to the lock. I had to take the door card off three or four times to get to the adjuster and play with the adjuster before the door worked to my satisfaction.

Guides: They're helpful, but not definitive!
 

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Discussion Starter #730
Well. I've managed to 'replace' the lost locking wheel nut adaptor. It took a bit mechanical bodgery, but it's done. In summary;

I bought a 2nd hand set of locking wheel nuts and their adaptor. These nuts would replace the ones on the Jag. Then I hunted around for an adaptor that closely matched the slots on the nuts that were sat on the Jag. With a felt tip pen. I marked on the adaptor, when the slots on the nuts were. Then it was into the garage and out with the Dremel.

The adaptors have 4 'high spots' on them. These 'high spots' engage with the slots on the nut. However. There are different adaptors (About 20 different ones). Of the 4 'high spots' on the slave adaptor. I had to narrow 3 and completely remove the 4th. I now had a weakened adaptor. Thankfully. I only needed to undo 4 nuts with it, then I could chuck it away.

Each nut was removed and replaced with a new one. I made a note of the letter that was stamped on the adaptor and (later) wrote it down in the Owners Manual. I made sure that I put the new adaptor in its correct slot in the boot!

For anyone looking. More often than not. It's cheaper to buy a set of locking nuts with an adaptor, than it is to buy an adaptor on its own. I actually bought 2 sets of nuts with adaptors. The whole lot was less than an adaptor on its own! I'll be keeping an eye out for a cheap spare adaptor, 'cos, you never know!

Bliss.....
 

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Discussion Starter #731
Just to let everyone know. An almost new nut adaptor arrived during the week. It's now safely stowed in its slot in the boot of the Jag. The somewhat worn spare is now in the drawer, where I keep my assorted sockets. Here endeth that lesson!

I'm hoping the weather is good this weekend. I still want to change the rear brake pads.
 

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Discussion Starter #732
THe deed is done. I've changed the rear brake pads! What a faff though. Even though I do have a brake piston retraction tool. There's no clear instructions on how to use it. I must've spent more time trying to figure out how it was used, than actually using it.

The pads I took out didn't have much life left in them. By the time the new ones were fitted. I found that i didn't have to top up the brake fluid. It was back up to the high mark!

One thing I did notice though. The caliper on the drivers side had been replaced at some point. It had a 'Reconditioned' sticker on it. The piston also retracted a lot easier then the one on the passenger side as well!
 

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Discussion Starter #734
Another two jobs ticked off!

With a car that's 18 years old. The plastic on the headlight lenses will degrade and fog. Although my Jag has been well looked after throughout its life. Keeping age at bay is important. Although headlamp restoring kits are available. Why spend the money when you can use toothpaste! It works very well! It also makes your headlighs smell minty as well.

The tyre pressures was the next job. The tyres themselves have plenty of tread on them. I wanted to change the tyres this year, for a set of Good Years (As recommended by assorted Jaguar Forums). However. Circumstances dictated otherwise. It was out with the electric pump. Not much air was needed. Just a wiff into each tyre.

That pretty much finishes everything needed for the MOT. I'm aiming do get the Jag through (When due) next month. I will need to drive the Jag around a bit, so the rear pads can bed in. Then it's a bit of a clean.
 

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Discussion Starter #735
The Jag goes in for its MOT on Thursday. I'm also having some other work done, while it's there.

When I changed the rear brake pads. The passenger side piston in the caliper was hard to screw in (While the drivers side was easy). I've decided to have the caliper changed. I've already mentioned that the drivers side caliper was replaced. It makes sense to have the other side done as well.

I'm also having the air-con re-gassed. It was due this year. So it makes sense to get it all done in one go!
 

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Discussion Starter #736
There's always one last job isn't there. Something you've forgotton to do. I'm no different. Good job I remembered then.

It wasn't until the middle of the day that I remembered that I hadn't checked the bulbs in the lights. It was a good job I did remember. One of the bulbs for the rear number plate had blown. Thankfully, I had some spares in a box in the garage. Unhappily, the plastic for the mounting is brittle. When I took out the bulb holder. Parts of the mounting broke away. I've bodged it for now. It used a heap of Blu-Tac to keep the bulb holder in place. Once the MOT is done. I'll try and find a spare.
 

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Discussion Starter #737
I suspect that everyone wants to know how things went. I have to give that Garage that deals with my Jag a fair chunk of kudos. They didn't actually 'do' the MOT. Why? I'll tell you.

The Jag would've failed the MOT on three points.
The rear left caliper: This was already known and was 'in hand' when the Jag was taken there this morning.

Both sills need welding: I've been waiting for this for years! My Jag is an early model. The sills were badly designed. There's no drain holes on the bottom (This design was changed a few years later). Considering the Jag is 18 years old and still on its original sills. It's done really well!

Rear suspension arm rusted: This was a bit of a surprise. If it's the trailing arm on the rear. Then it's a known problem. I'm not that worried.

The prime reason that the MOT wasn't carried out, was the Garage could quote for the entire work to get the Jag through its MOT. I'm expecting the Bill to be big! As long as it's not more than I gave for the Jag to start with. I'll be happy. That's over £1000 I'm able to spend!
 

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I suppose you trust that garage. I am always suspicios when garage that needs to do the MoT finds things needs repairing to pass MoT and they can do that for some amount ...
 

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Be careful of 'MOT pass weld repairs' - these often consist of simply welding a plate over the hole, then slapping underseal over everything.

The correct way of course is to carefully sand back to good, clean metal, cut out of the rust, then flush in new Steel and spray up properly.

I suspect that an MOT garage is unlikely to do this the correct way, so you need to ask them.

Good luck.
 
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Discussion Starter #740
I can answer that one easily.

When I had my Rover 400. It failed on the sills and the areas below the rear doors. The Garage had already cut away the bad metal and treated the exposed metal. It was quite a sight when he opened the rear doors. There were large yellow edged holes near the bottom, just above the sills. It's unlikely the Garage will patch over the bad metal, based on what they did to the Rover. Onto today's progress.

The bloke at the Garage has family issues at the moment, so he wasn't there when I went to get the quote. Another bloke had a quick look at the computer and gave me the ballpark figure (Unfinished quote). Even if I doubled the figure I was given. It's not as bad as I thought. I've given them my Home number. Fingers crossed. I'll get the proper quote and a day to take the Jag in.
 
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