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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,
After 12 years of happy motoring on the 620 Diesel (she's 22 now, still works sweet as a nut), I finally I bought a TI. I wasn't really considering it but after viewing the car with only 50 000 genuine miles on the clock, it was very hard to resist. And that combination of Racing Green with the cream leather interior (yes, it's a European model, so no half-leather) really did it for me. I needed to sort out a few minor typical issues, such as the broken front window regulator and a hole in the back box.
Now, upon lifting the bonnet I was confronted with a completely different sight from what I had got used to. So many different sensors, hoses, cables, the space is definitely more limited than on the diesel.
To start with, I would like to replace the timing belt and tensioner. How hard is it really? On the diesel I had to place a pin in the flywheel before anything else. Are there any marks on the pulleys? Anything I need to be careful about?
Sure, there will be more questions to come but I think this is a good start. I can't wait to get her on the road. Any advice, please?
 

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It's very sad that you don't have even one reply. I have one of the 2 litre Honda cars so cannot help. Looks like the 620 sub-forum is all but dead :(
 

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Unfortunately I also have Honda engined 600. Sad to see no one is writing anything on these cars. However, it is true that there is not much to write about them as they so rarely brake if maintained properly.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for your answers! I haven't posted for a long time, I did not expect the 600 has become that obsolete. There used to be some lively discussions on here, especially regarding the 2.0 turbo petrol which I used to follow with great interest. Personally, I learned a lot about my diesel from this place. Now that I've bought the ultimate 600, the mighty ti, everyone seems to have got rid of them. Well, time goes on, however I'll try to keep her on the road as long as I can.
 

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Good luck and happy motoring, nice to see 600:s are still being driven and looked after. TI:s are getting rare, also other 600's.
If you have done timing belt services before, replacing the timing belt on a T-Series is rather easy. You could find a manual for Rover 600 or 800, covering the t-series engine, some can be found online in pdf format.
The crank aux belt pulley mark should be at 90° BTDC(all pistons are at the same level) and the timing marks on cam pulleys have arrows pointing at each other(all the marks are on the same line). Manuals say that a timing pin/drill bit could be installed to lock the flywheel, the location is behind the exhaust pipe/turbo oil return pipe at the gearbox plate.
Check that the free length of the tensioner spring is max. 58,5 mm. The timing kits don't contain a new spring so an old one must be used.
When tensioning the belt, crankshaft locked and tensioner belt loose, you should turn the inlet cam pulley anti-clockwise with a torque of 40 Nm. This will take the slack from the belt from one side and leave all the slack to the spring to deal with. Then tighten the tensioner bolt and the tension should be correct.

What can make the job hard is that the small cam belt cover bolts can be stuck in the brass nuts pressed in the covers. Then the nut just turns and the bolt won't open. It is why you need to put some grease on those bolts when installing the covers back. Always replace the auxiliary belt in time because if it snaps, pieces of it may end up in the cam belt cover causing an engine failure.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you for your excellent post! Very informative! I’ve done the belt on the L-series before with no issues, I hope I can do this one too. Thanks again for your time, you helped a lot!
 

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I did my first timing belt replacement on a 620ti a couple of months ago and it all seemed fairly straightforward.

I didn't bother locking the crank, but I bought the cam locking tool to ensure that they didn't drift and then I used the notches & arrows to verify that the timing was correct as it all went back together. You'll need a pulley holder tool to brace the aux pulley while you undo the crank nut. There's an official Rover one, I bought a universal one on eBay which did the trick.

Otherwise, all I can say is Good Luck. Let me know if I can help in any way.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for your advice! As I gather, the engine needs to be lifted up in order to free up space for access to lower cover and tensioner. Is it ok if I place the sump on a wooden block and then lower the car onto it? At least that was how I proceeded with the diesel.
I dont have the cam locking tool, probably not a good idea to start without it. Also I cant seem to find the hole for the crank locking, somewhere behind the turbo probably, which makes it difficult to access. Will look again. Thanks so much!
 

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I jacked the engine up onto a wooden block. Seemed to take the weight just fine. You'll also need to remove most (more than you'd think) of the nearside engine mount to remove the cam cover.

You might be able to fashion something to lock the cams, but it was £12 on eBay so I thought I might as well do it right.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I have to say that yesterday, after half a day of taking bits apart and then back on again, finally the t-series has a new belt. The old one showed 2007 printed on it, so I guess it was about time:) Do you know how tight the belt should be? The old one was very loose. Someone tightened the bolt on the tensioner before the spring could fully shrink, I don't know why.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I think I have a probem now. I started the car this evening and I could hear some slight knocking from the top part of the engine. Turned it off immediately. The knocking wasn't there with the old belt. Even last night when I finished, started up and it was all fine. I checked the timing marks at least ten times yesterday, manually rotated the crank with no problems and now this knocking ruined my day. Could it be out of timing or what? Anything I might have ruined?
 

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It doesn't sound like timing to me. I would check the timing again though just to be sure. Otherwise I don't have any advice except check all the usual cuplits.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I will check it again, And if for some reason the timing moved, doyou think the valves will be ok? I haven’t driven the car, just for a while at tickover.
 

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In my experience, yes, the valves will be ok. I discovered the belt on mine had slipped a tooth on on the exhaust cam sprocket will no observable effects (although I've not actually had the head off to inspect the valves).
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Just rechecked everything, the marks are spot on. IN and EX arrows on two pulleys pointing at each other, the crankshaft pulley at 9o'clock with a pin inserted in the flywheel. The knocking still there. What a mystery!
 

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Obviously too late now, but it’s always a good policy just to check all the alignment marks line up before removing the old belt. If there are any discrepancies then they will be known before dismantling anything, and there can be a school of thought which points to - if it ran well before then setting it at that should mean it will run fine again when the new belt is fitted.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
It sounds more like noisy tappets to me. The old belt was rather old and loose. Now with the new one being tighter, probably this brought some change to the way camshafts are pushing at the valves. Does the t-series have self-adjusting lifters or they need to be adjusted every now and then?
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Just a quick update in case anyone is interested. The knocking sound now disappeared on its own. It was noisy lifters. By turning the crankshaft over by hand I must have pumped all the oil out, leaving the top end dry. It took around 20 min on tickover for the oil to go up again. Pretty stressful experience, especially after a belt change but who would have thought?
 
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